Vaccinationsstethoscope

Children’s Vaccines

For more information regarding children’s vaccines and childhood health, please visit our Child Health Services page.


Travel Vaccinations

For more information regarding travel vaccines, please visit our Foreign Travel page.


Flu Vaccinations

The National Flu Immunisation Programme 2018/2019:

The flu vaccine is available every year, free of charge on the NHS to help protect adults and children at risk of flu and its complications.

Flu can be unpleasant, but if you are otherwise healthy it will usually clear up on its own within a week.
However people in certain high risk groups are more likely to develop potentially serious complications from flu, such as bronchitis or pneumonia, so it’s recommended that they have a flu vaccine every year to help protect them.

The flu vaccine is routinely offered:

Anyone who will be 65 years or over on March 31 2019.

Those aged 6 months to 64 years who fall into any of the following high risk groups:

  • Pregnant women
  • All 2, 3, and 4 year olds (see our Child Health Services page.)
  • Those in long stay residential care homes
  • Carers registered with the practice
  • Patients with any of the following medical conditions:
    • Chronic heart disease
    • Chronic respiratory disease
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Chronic liver disease
    • Patients who are diabetic (any type)
    • Patients with any form of immunosuppression
    • Patients with any chronic degenerative neurological disease including:
      • stroke
      • TIA
      • cerebral palsy
      • MS

The practice holds several dedicated flu clinics throughout the autumn and winter months and we will contact eligible patients to arrange their vaccinations at the start of the annual flu season (from September – October onwards).

Is There Anyone Who Shouldn’t Have the Flu Vaccine?

Most adults can have the injected flu vaccine, but you should avoid it if you have had a serious allergic reaction to a flu vaccine in the past.

Please speak you your GP or a Practice Nurse if you have any concerns about receiving the flu vaccine.

Egg allergy and the flu vaccine

People who have an egg allergy may be at increased risk of reaction to the injectable flu vaccine because some flu vaccines are made using eggs.

In recent years, flu vaccines that are egg-free have become available. If an egg-free flu vaccine isn’t available, your GP may be able to find a suitable flu vaccine with a low egg content.

Depending on the severity of your egg allergy, your GP may decide to refer you to a specialist to have the vaccination in hospital.

Fever and the flu vaccine

If you are ill with a fever, it’s best to delay your flu vaccination until you have recovered. There is no need to delay your flu vaccine if you have a minor illness with no fever such as a cold.

Antibiotics and the flu vaccine

It is fine to have the flu vaccine while you are taking antibiotics.


You can find more information regarding the National Flu Immunisation Programme on the NHS Website.


Pneumonia Vaccinations

Pneumococcal vaccine

The pneumococcal vaccine protects against serious and potentially fatal pneumococcal infections. It’s also known as the pneumonia vaccine.

A pneumococcal infection can affect anyone, however some people are at a higher risk of developing serious illnesses and it is recommended they receive the pneumococcal vaccination.

The pneumonia vaccine is routinely offered to:

Children under 2 (see our Child Health Services page)

Anyone aged 65 years or over

Those aged 2 to 64 years who fall into any of the following high risk groups:

  • Patients with any of the following long term medical conditions:
    • Chronic heart disease
    • Chronic respiratory disease
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Chronic liver disease
    • Patients who are diabetic (any type)
    • Patients with any form of immunosuppression
  • Patients who have a cochlear implant (a hearing device)
  • Patients who have had their spleen removed (splenectomy)
  • Patients who have a history of problems with their spleen and those at risk of developing spleen problems (eg. Patients with coeliac disease)
  • Patients who have had a leak of cerebrospinal fluid (the clear fluid that surrounds the brain and spine) – this could be the result of an accident or surgery

Some people with an occupational risk are advised to have the pneumococcal vaccine, including those who work with metal fumes, such as welders.

How Often Is the Pneumococcal Vaccine Given?

Children under 2 receive a form of pneumococcal vaccination know as the Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme. It is given in 3 doses between 8 weeks and 1 year (see our Child Health Services page).

Adults and children over 2 receive a form of pneumococcal vaccination known as Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPV). People aged 65 and over only need a single pneumococcal vaccination. The pneumococcal vaccine is not given annually like the flu jab.

Patients in high risk groups and those with certain underlying health problems may need a booster vaccination every 5 years – your GP can tell you if you will need any booster vaccinations.

If you are eligible you can have the pneumococcal vaccine at any time of year, but it may be more convenient to receive it at the same time as your flu vaccine.

If you believe you are eligible and you have yet to be contacted by the surgery regarding the pneumococcal vaccine, please speak to your GP or to a Practice Nurse.

Is There Anyone Who Shouldn’t Have the Pneumococcal Vaccine?

Most people can have the pneumococcal vaccine, but it may not be possible for you to have it if you have had a serious allergic reaction to a vaccine (or to any ingredient in the pneumococcal vaccine) in the past.

Please speak you your GP if you have any concerns about receiving the pneumococcal vaccine.

Fever and the pneumococcal vaccine

If you are ill with a fever, it’s best to delay your pneumococcal vaccine until you have recovered. There is no need to delay your pneumococcal vaccine if you have a minor illness with no fever such as a cold.

Pregnancy and the pneumococcal vaccine

There is no evidence that the pneumococcal vaccine is harmful either to a pregnant woman or to her baby. However, as a precaution, women who need the vaccine should receive it before becoming pregnant, if possible. Please speak you your GP if you have any concerns regarding the pneumococcal vaccine and pregnancy.


You can find more information regarding the pneumonia vaccine on the NHS Website.


Shingles Vaccinations

The National Shingles Vaccine Programme

Shingles is a viral infection of the nerve cells that develops as a result of a chickenpox infection.  Once a person has recovered from chickenpox the virus lies dormant in the nerve cells and can reactivate at a later stage when the immune system is weakened.
The incidence of shingles increases with age and the severity of symptoms also increases as individuals get older.

The shingles vaccine (know as Zostavax) is a one-off vaccination, it is not given annually like the flu jab. Eligible patients can have the shingles vaccination at any time of year, but it may be more convenient receive it at the same time as your flu vaccine.

Who Can Have the Shingles Vaccination?

You’re eligible for the shingles vaccine if you are aged 70 or 78 years old.

In addition, anyone who was previously eligible (born on or after September 2 1942) but missed out on their shingles vaccination remains eligible until their 80th birthday.

This easy to read poster explains who is eligible to receive the Shingles vaccine, or you can check your eligibility use using Public Health England’s online Shingles Calculator.

Please note, the shingles vaccine is not available on the NHS to anyone aged 80 or over because it seems to be less effective in this age group.

If you are eligible and you have yet to be contacted by the surgery regarding the shingles vaccine, please contact us and book an appointment with a Nurse to receive your vaccine.


You can find more information regarding the National Shingles Vaccine Programme on the NHS Website.